Image
Top
Navigation
Menu

You Are Not Alone

an UMCOR-sponsored initiative for unaccompanied migrant children

You Are Not Alone Brochure


No Están Solos Pagina En Español


.

Upcoming Events

Welcome Centers

These centers will provide services to resource families legally, relationally, and recreationally.

North Hills

15435 Rayen Street, North Hills, CA 91343
(747) 529-4783

http://www.noestassolonorthhills.org/

Claremont UMC (Spanish)

211 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 538-5350  |  churchoffice@claremontumc.org

IMU Manantial de Vida y Luz (UMC Escondido) 341 S. Kalmia St., Escondido CA 92025
Brisa Lopez  |  (760) 745-5100

Take Action

Sign Up to Volunteer Subscribe to our Email List DONATE ONLINE NOW

Or, send a check today:

You Are Not Alone Program
PO Box 6006
Pasadena, CA 91102-6006

Overview

The purpose of this program is to work through our growing network of Immigrant Welcoming congregations to be an extension of God’s welcoming, healing embrace to the thousands of unaccompanied migrant children ( and their families) who have made the perilous journey from Central America to seek refuge among us.

Our overarching goal is to reach out to these children and their families through United Methodist Churches located near them becoming places of welcome and healing for them through partnerships with community organizations.

In 2015/16 we will partner with our Cal-Pac Camps and Retreats to provide two therapeutic retreat experiences for migrant children and their families. In 2016/17 we will repeat the two retreats, this time using a Freedom School empowerment model.

Contact Us

The You Are Not Alone Official Facebook Page

Rev. David Farley
Director of Justice and Compassion Ministries
dfarley@calpacumc.org
(626)568-7356

Blanca Alcántara-Hershey
“You Are Not Alone” Migrant Children’s Program coordinator
balcantara_hershey@calpacumc.org
(626) 568-7374 M-F 9 am – 3 pm

Details

Donate Supplies

Health Kit Materials

  • baby diapers
  • hand towel
  • towel
  • washcloth
  • comb/ brush
  • metal nail file or nail clippers
  • bath-size soap
  • toothpaste
  • toothbrush (Do not remove from original packaging.)
  • adhesive bandages
  • common household Band-Aids.
  • body lotion
  • Shampoo
  • feminine toiletries

Food

  • food gift card (recommended)
  • canned food
  • pasta
  • grains (rice and beans)
  • cereal
  • flour

Clothes (any/used or new)

  • baby clothes
  • baby diapers
  • sweaters
  • shirts
  • shorts
  • jeans
  • undergarments (new)
  • shoes

School Kit Materials

  • backpacks
  • pair blunt scissors
  • pads of paper
  • hand-held pencil sharpener
  • 30-centimeter ruler
  • unsharpened pencils
  • 2-inch or larger-size eraser
  • 24-count box of crayons

Bedding Kit Materials

  • flat sheets
  • pillows
  • pillowcase

Other

  • educational toys
  • games
  • children’s books
Tools & Services
Legal Services

CARECEN
www.carecen-la.org
Office
2845 W. 7th St. Los Angeles, CA 90005
Phone: (213) 385-7800
Legal Department/General Information
(213) 385-7800 ext. 136
Fax: 213.385.1094
info@carecen-la.org

Legal Services

NILC
www.nilc.org
Los Angeles, CA
National Headquarters
PO Box 70067
Los Angeles, CA 90070
(213) 639-3900 | (213) 639-3911 fax
reply@nilc.org

Mental Health Services

AMANECER
www.amanecerla.org
1200 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 608
Los Angeles, CA 90017
Tel: (213) 481-7464

Circumstances
Although the surge of unaccompanied minors at the border has subsided somewhat it is still estimated that over 70,000 children will have fled violence and impoverishment in Central America and made their way into the US by the end of this year. Also the push factors that have caused these children to leave their homelands have not changed and it is still more dangerous to be a civilian in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala than it was in Iraq at the height of the war. It is expected that thousands of children and families will continue to undertake the harrowing journey. A large portion of these children would qualify for refugee status if provided the right legal representation and so we are beginning to see them arrive in our communities here in Southern California as they are placed with relatives and sponsors. This violent displacement of so many poor children from Central America is a disaster whose victims are arriving near the doorsteps of our churches.

It is this humanitarian crisis that the California Pacific Conference of the UMC seeks to address through our “You Are Not Alone” Program for Migrant Children. We have developed our action plan with two important facts in mind regarding the challenges faced by unaccompanied minors and their families:

  • Their greatest need will be for post release services when they are placed with relatives or sponsors, particularly legal assistance, mental health, and other family support services.
  • Southern California is receiving the second largest number of unaccompanied minors of any region in the country. We have heard that L.A. alone will be receiving at least 6,000. However our sources tell us these children are arriving in all areas of Southern CA and that there are still large numbers arriving in all of our counties and the services for those in outlying areas are even fewer. It is essential that we have a conference wide strategy so that our churches can be in ministry with the unaccompanied minors in neighborhoods throughout So Cal. It is said that more than 75% of these children suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of their horrific journey. Their relatives or sponsors are often poor and vulnerable themselves and ill-equipped to deal with such a challenge. They are provided no funds for legal assistance or other family services.
Background Information
May-June 2014: Surge of unaccompanied Central American children crossing the border due to violence and political upheaval.

National average age of apprehended children:

84% Teens Age 13-17
16% Under Age 12
(1.5% Under Age 5)

AGE OF CHILDREN IN CALIFORNIA:

0-5 92 Children (1.82%)
6-11 461 Children (9.13%)
12-17 3,645 Children (72.19%)
18 851 Young Adults (16.85%)

GENDER:
Male: 1231 Children (62.87%)
Female: 727 Children (37.13%)

Fiscal Year 2014
Statewide: 5,831
LA County: 2,949

Fiscal Year 2015 (October – December)
Statewide: 677
LA County: 301

[insert graphic]

by CHIRLA

Political Updates

Summer 2014 and the 113th Congress

Trafficking Victims Protection and Reauthorization Act (TVPRA) and protecting the current rule of law
Law that allows for the current system by which the unaccompanied children are sent through (DHHS, ORR)
Advocacy with House, Senate members and the Administration to ensure that they would stand strong on TVPRA protections

President Obama’s 3.7 billion dollars
Major portion of the funding went towards funding enforcement (DHS, CBP)

Judiciary committee hearings on unaccompanied minor children and border security

Negative republican narrative
Republican attacks on credible fear and asylum narrative (A system that is already difficult to navigate)

Relevant Federal Legislation

  • H.R. 4936 Vulnerable Immigrant Voice Act of 2014 (VIVA) (2014)
  • Allows for council to children who need representation
  • H.R. 5143 The Protection of Children Act (2014, 2015)
  • H.R. 5137 The Asylum Reform and Border Patrol Act (2014, 2015)

Bills seek to rollback protections afforded to the UACs under the TVPRA
Would force DHHS to share guardian and family information of the UAC with ICE which may put extended family members in danger of deportation.

Implementation

a) There will be an Immigrant Welcoming Congregations Gathering for orientation and training related to Unaccompanied Migrant Children and their families and to strategize how to build relationships and partner with the community to provide services as well as act in solidarity with the families.

b) Church Based – “You Are Not Alone” Migrant Children Welcome Centers will be established, one in each of the 4 California Districts. The churches where these Welcome Centers would be established will be chosen from our most strategically located and active Immigrant Welcoming Congregations, those who already have established relationships with the immigrant community. These centers would receive support from and be a resource for the broader Immigrant Welcoming Congregations Network.

The tasks of these Welcome Centers would be the following:

  • To serve as an info and referral center for connecting to emergency services, legal assistance, mental health, spiritual support and counseling services.
  • To partner with Cal-Pac Neighborhood Immigration Clinics and other legal service organizations to provide regular “know your rights” workshops and Legal Clinics on site;
  • To have on site emergency supplies available for the children and families such as: food, toiletries, health kits, blankets, school supplies, phone cards, emergency housing and transportation vouchers, toys and children’s books.
  • To partner with the Pastoral Counseling Dept/Center at Claremont School of Theology and other mental health organizations to provide trauma support groups and other mental health and spiritual support on site and at other Immigrant Welcoming Congregations.
  • To provide regular hospitality meals and celebrations to bring the congregation together with the children and families to continue to build a healing and supportive relationship and to let them know (without proselytizing) that that those seeking a community of faith are welcome to make the church their spiritual home.
  • To assist in finding sponsors for unaccompanied minors.
  • To gather together regularly as leadership teams at the 4 sites as well as with the broader Immigrant Welcoming Congregations Network for mutual support, trainings and to strategize for joint action regarding policies that affect migrant children and their families.

 

c) In 2015/16 we will partner with our Cal-Pac Conference Office of Camping ministries to provide 2 therapeutic camping experiences for migrant children and their families suffering from many forms of trauma due to their experiences of poverty, violence, the breakup of their family and their frightening journey here.

  • The camps will be staffed by members from our Immigrant Welcoming Congregations and resourced by mental health workers and Claremont pastoral counseling students.
  • Welcome Centers and Immigrant Welcoming Congregations would recruit affected families for the camp from relationships they have established in their neighborhoods.
  • Relationships would be strengthened through the camping experience and continue through follow up at the Welcome Centers and the Immigrant Welcoming congregations following the camping experience.

d) In 2016/17 we will repeat the 2 camps but this time in partnership with the Children’s Defense Fund and the UCLA Labor Center, using a Freedom School model. The camps would transition from a therapeutic model to a “Freedom School” approach, moving from the healing of trauma to the building of self-esteem, empowerment and leadership development. Again, the relationships strengthened at these camps would continue to be developed through follow up at the Welcome Centers and Immigrant Welcoming Congregations following the camping experience